picnic in the parkWhen I was a teenager, I did the est training. I remember that the trainer spoke about the uselessness of hope. To demonstrate, he held up his car keys and said, “Hope that these keys don’t fall.” Then, of course, he dropped his keys to the ground. Hope doesn’t work, does it? I saw the proof with my own eyes.

Looking back, I see what a disservice that was to me at such an impressionable time. For many years after that, I didn’t allow myself to hope. When I got consciously onto a spiritual path, I realized how wonderful hope was and I allowed that spark to reside again in my heart. It’s made a huge difference in my happiness quotient.

For ASD parents, hope seems so very, very important. What else could keep us going when there are no signs of improvement in our chldren? I believe that hope is the best medicine parents can take in our situation — a direct antidote for the depression that can come along with having a child on the spectrum.

3 1/2 years ago, when Joseph was diagnosed, I had very little hope. I was bone weary and grieving in body, mind and soul. But the human spirit is resilient, and we had the grace of a team of people who held us up as parents and worked with our kid.

And now — after years of RDI, biomedical treatment, occupational therapy, blood, sweat, tears and prayers, Joseph is on his way to recovery.

I do not say that lightly. I say it with trepidation that the gods will quash me for my audaciousness.

But I also am not the only one saying it. Yesterday Joseph’s swim teacher – a tough German lady who stands no nonsense – told me that, in all her years of working with ASD kids, she’s never seen one grow so much so fast. I watched the swim lesson and I saw it, too. She asked, “Whose turn is it?” and Joseph said, “Mine! Mine!” Later she gave him a hard time for jumping in too soon and he argued with her. It was great.

And then there was today. Joseph’s preschool teacher pronounced him cured, healed. She said she can’t even talk about mainstreaming him anymore, because there is no special needs kid to mainstream.

So, you see? I am not making this up. Joseph has been on Valtrex for ten weeks today, and it has made an amazing change in his life, in our lives. But he had to be ready. It took all those years of helping to heal his gut, of strengthening his immune system — basically of laying the foundation — before Valtrex could step in and do its magic.

I know he is doing years’ worth of development in weeks, and I appreciate the raves from his teachers. But I don’t think I can let up yet: We’re not all the way there. We still have crowds and gatherings to work on, pronouns to get right, vocabulary to build up.

I also have yet to hear Joseph say, “Mom, look!” You know how some mothers feel they will die happy when their kid gets married? I feel that way about when I’ll hear, “Watch me, Mom!” for the first time.

But you know what? I think these things are coming. I hope they are coming. I pray they are coming.

Yes, I got hope. And how grateful I am for it: that thing with feathers that perches in my soul.

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