It’s Joseph’s screaming that gets me more than anything else. Or maybe it’s his screaming on top of major sleep deprivation — for both of us.

I mean, I understand that regression is part of moving forward for ASD kids — and even, in less extremes, for all kids. But just now it seems that we’re spending equal time in both departments. And I’m getting bloody tired of regression.

Do you have any idea what it’s like to feel that your kid is — after years of hard, non-stop work — recovering from autism: looking you in the eye, speaking with you, sharing his inner world with you — and then to have him fade away again before your very eyes?

Actually, “fade away” doesn’t do it justice. He’s screaming. He’s barking like a dog until late in the night and early in the morning. He’s fixated on certain things, like our cat’s comings and goings. And he’s very, very anxious.

So I’m not sleeping well and I’m feeling pretty anxious myself. As a long-time yogini, I give myself a really hard time about not being able to stay even-minded through these things. And then I give myself shit about giving myself shit. I mean, why can’t I lay off myself and have a human experience sometimes? Why do I have to be Super Yogi all the time?

Maybe it’s time to get my father’s critical voice out of my head. But we’ll save that subject for another blog.

Blue Eyes wanted to leave early for work this morning. I told him he needed to stay because I was going to abuse this kid if I was left alone with him.

It’s not true in the legal sense — certainly I wouldn’t have hurt him physically. But emotionally I was ready to break down and scream right back, say some things I’ve never said and, God willing, never will say. Things like wishing sometimes that he’d never been born or how sick I am of his autism — that kind of thing.

I’ve taught yoga and meditation for 20+ years, and so have probably told people thousands of times to breathe. But sometimes it is just hard to breathe. And if you can’t breathe some of those full, deep, renewing breaths, then your mind and body are both really tense. That’s where I was this morning.

After I dropped Joseph off at preschool, I drove to a nearby trail and took a walk. I walked fast, for two reasons: I had pent-up energy to expend, and I knew it would force me to breathe.

So there I was, walking up a hill, breathing (finally), and suddenly I remembered: it’s all stories.

It’s all stories! The mind makes ’em up like crazy. Especially when we panic. And if we believe the crazy, anxious mind making up wild, horrible stories that very likely won’t come true, then we go into a downward spiral. Anxiety, crazy thinking, scary stories, anxiety, crazy thinking, scary stories.

I am discovering (again and again and again and again) that the answer to everything is this: BE PRESENT. Even more fun, be present with an open heart. Feel the Divine presence, look for it, listen to it, and know that guidance and help are here. Now.

So this blog’s title, In Search of: Serenity, is a catch-22. If you’re in search of something, it means you don’t have it. It is something you have to obtain, procure, acquire somehow.

When I am present, when I let go of the stories, then serenity is who I am. There is no need to go anywhere or to do anything to get it.

Right now I have an easier space in which to be present and open. In a few hours I will pick up Joseph and it will probably be more of a challenge (or so says my mind). Well, I’m going to practice now, while it’s easier, and we’ll see what happens when it does.

The very nature of life is impermanent. I am playing the  role I have chosen and Joseph is playing the role he has chosen.  It won’t last forever; it is only now and now and now.

Peace.

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