I grew up in a determinedly non-religious, Jewish family. I believe that I always felt God’s whispers in my heart, but I didn’t know what to do with them. In my college years, as I experimented with various drugs, my longing began to emerge more fully.

How I wanted a spiritual teacher. I remember one night, looking up into the stars, beseeching the heavens for that person who would teach me about spiritual matters, who would help me to know God.

That was the first time I ever got an answer from the Universe. It was: wait.

I was both terribly depressed and absolutely thrilled that Someone, Something had responded to my call. And I waited. And I watched.

When I finally found that my path was an inner one of meditation and a more universal view of God, I dove in headfirst. Things were rosy and exciting. Many times I felt God’s quiet, inner presence guiding me or loving me. And I loved her back.

Then I got an email from my best childhood friend. Her brother, Daniel Pearl, was the reporter from the Wall Street Journal who was kidnapped in Afghanistan. The Pearls had taught me all I knew about the Jewish religion and our families had been very close for a while. I had watched while the Pearl children went to Hebrew school. I celebrated Passover and Sabbath with them. They are exceptional, talented people who live their lives with integrity.

After Danny was brutally murdered, I had to process through all the grief and horror just like everyone else who’d known him and loved him. And one of the discoveries I made was that I had a belief that ran like this:

If I do everything right, God will leave me alone.

Leave me alone in the respect that He won’t do anything horrible to me, in that tragedy won’t touch my life too terribly. But when I saw what happened to the Pearls, knowing that they “did everything right,” I realized that the game was much bigger than I thought.

So, I asked myself, why do I even try to connect with God if she won’t take care of me, won’t  play nice with me?

Ultimately I came to the fact that I am a part of God. I cannot separate from him no matter how he treats me, and I will always want to connect more deeply for the same reason a wave always melts back into the sea.  We are one.

But this God figure is tough. She is not only awesome; she is awful. It is the awful grace of God that one runs into in one’s life,  once or twice or more often – depending on what kind of lifetime you’re having.

The Goddess Kali, from the Hindu tradition, personifies this tough aspect of God. Ma Kali is a black-skinned Goddess who wears a garland made of 52 skulls and a skirt made of dismembered arms. In two of Her hands, She holds a sword and a freshly severed head that is dripping blood. She can appear to be wrathful and terrifying.

I knew an Indian man who was an ardent follower of God as Kali. He prayed to her constantly, worshipped her daily, constantly asked her to appear to him. For around 25 years he never stopped asking to see her in form. He longed, he wept, he pleaded to see her for himself.

Well, one day as he was praying he looked up, and there she was. Do you know what he did when the object of all that longing was finally there, right in front of him?

He screamed in terror and ran.

The Goddess Kali can do this to people.

Since autism entered my life, I have felt Kali as a constant companion. Her ferociousness has blown me away. Her willingness to sever my ego is enough to make me scream with pain.

And yet. Kali is said to be a most compassionate mother because she provides moksha, or liberation, to her children. She is the destroyer of unreality. When the ego sees Kali it trembles with fear because the ego sees in her its own eventual demise.

Underneath all the scary parts of Kali is the loving Mother, who is sweet, affectionate, and overflowing with incomprehensible love for Her children.

At this point in the autism journey, I can see both these sides of Kali. I am amazed at how surgically precise she is at removing my illusions, and how willing she is to do so — without anesthesia, I might add — for my own good.

But I am not so scared of her anymore. A few years wrassling with one’s opponent can build up, perhaps not friendship, but most certainly respect. Mostly now I feel her when, for example, the pangs of wanting a neurotypical kid get strong – when I feel I missed out on most of the fun of raising a child. I hear her laugh when I indulge in self-pity.

And I have come to trust her. God, in the form of Kali, is tough. The epitome of tough Love, if you will. But fire, while searing, is also purifying. Sometimes now, in that roaring fire, I will feel her love. I will know that the Mother is with me, tenderly looking out for my highest spiritual potential.

So, I have learned, it’s most certainly not about doing everything right in order to avoid the Big Lessons from the Big Guy. What a relief to give up on that one.

It’s about learning to surrender into that which is hammering at you, learning to see with clarity beyond the illusions in front of you — and, most importantly, to really, really know that it’s all being done out of Love. We came from Love, we will go back to Love, and Love is here and now, always, always.

In my journey, it’s required tough love to bring on an experience of true love. Such is the dance of spirituality and autism.

Advertisements