You know that river that runs through Egypt — the one that we all jump into and swim around in, now and then?

DeNile — that’s the one!

I have great respect for denial.  I also seem to have a fondness for swimming in it. Today we met with our new RDI consultant, and I discovered that I’d been floating in that river yet again.

But before I explain, let me take you back a couple of weeks.

Two weeks ago, our amazing occupational therapist gave us a dozen activities to do with Joseph — activities that focus on bilateral (using both hands in a way that they coordinate with each other) movement, and movement that crosses the midline. We’ve been conscientiously doing them almost every day.

Suddenly Joseph became more competent in swimming, drawing and numbers. He started spelling out words on his own. When we drove in the car, he insisted that I roll the windows down so that he could shout, “Hi!” “Hello there!” to passersby — and laugh merrily when they responded. So it’s been a fun two weeks.

On Monday Joseph started insisting that he was ready for kindergarten. I think he is noticing that, while he is almost 6, the other kids in preschool are 3, 4, and 41/2.

Well, it just so happened that, on Tuesday morning, I had an appointment scheduled with the principal/special needs coordinator of our local elementary school. Among other things, I mentioned Joseph’s academic progress and his desire to go to kindergarten.

She was all over it. “Let’s get him in!” she said enthusiastically. “No time like the present!”

On Friday, we are going to visit one kindergarten class for an hour. We’ll visit another one next week sometime.

So I’ve been feeling pretty good about this — feeling that Joseph is ready and willing, feeling that it would work.

Then John came. He is our RDI consultant.

He is new (to us). Kelli, our former beloved RDI consultant, has moved on to different work. So John went to Joseph’s preschool today and observed for 1.5 hours. He came over late this afternoon, and we talked.

He couldn’t say too much about the improvement-needed areas with Joseph in the vicinity, but he did manage to get in one concept: Joseph is not presently other-minded.

Other-mindedness. Ahhhhh.

Other-mindedness is one of the biggest deficits in autism. When someone doesn’t have it, it shows up as an inability to borrow someone else’s perspective, to understand that other people think differently from oneself. It is an inability to consider what someone else might be thinking.

Other-mindedness is the foundation of a good friendship or a good marriage. Or maybe even a good life.

In other words, it is a big one.

Kids start developing other-mindedness around the age of 1 or 2. John talked about working with a 12 year-old who most people couldn’t even tell was on the spectrum. John and this kid were running to a window to wash it together when John fell (on purpose) and began moaning terribly about his hurt knee.

The kid looked back and asked, “Are you all right?” Then he ran the rest of the way to the window and began cleaning it while John lay on the floor, moaning in pain. His mother, watching through a see-through mirror, couldn’t believe it.

It’s a foundational thing, a fundamental building block. Without it, we are painfully lost in most social situations.

Jesus showed very advanced other-mindedness in Matthew 12:25: And knowing their thoughts Jesus said to them, “Any kingdom divided against itself is laid waste; and any city or house divided against itself will not stand [emphasis mine].

I am not grieving about this deficit. Nor am I even beating myself up about not noticing it (consciously) before. Denial, after all, has its place.

I just feel extremely grateful that it has been pointed out to us and that we have the tools and support to get it going. We are in good hands with John.

John had Blue Eyes and me running around the living room with him as he tossed a ball to one or the other of us. We never knew who would get it and had to watch carefully to see what he was thinking.

I can see that cultivating other-mindedness is going to be a tremendous step forward for Joseph. I am excited to begin.

I can also see that, though Joseph is right on target academically, he still needs some help socially. Maybe it’s not time for kindergarten. Those kids are really sophisticated socially.

I don’t know. But I’m getting used to not knowing. It’s almost getting to be a comfortable place to hang out.

One of our earlier RDI objectives was about learning from past experiences and applying those lessons to future ones. If I was to do that  in this situation, I would realize that the right things (working on bilateral movements, a new RDI consultant) have come along at the right time. All I need to do is to stay open, to watch for the signs, to listen for the whispers.

It’s worked before, and it’ll work now. God is guiding me no matter where I am or what I’m doing. He’s there with me, always. He is in my corner.

Even when I’m just floating comfortably in DeNile.

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