Earlier this week, I picked Joseph up from school and we did the hour’s drive to the RDI consultant’s office. John had set up his neurotypical boys to interact with Joseph in a playgroup-like setting.

(Some kids get picked up from school and taken to soccer practice or music practice. In my mind, I refer to our after-school trips as “normal practice.” But I digress.)

We go into the office and the first thing John wants the kids to do is play a board game together. Now, Joseph is not a board game player. There is something about board games that he doesn’t get. So Joseph looks at the game and whines, “I don’t like board games. They’re too hard!”

It’s Chutes and Ladders, one of the easiest games in the world. I pull John aside and say,  “Joseph doesn’t do well with board games.” I’ve been cogitating on his answer ever since. He said:

“I don’t want this to be another thing that’s left out.”

When we have babies, a lot of things get left out: nights out, adult conversations, a full night’s sleep, sex — that sort of thing. But eventually things get more or less normalized and there isn’t such deprivation.

Not so with autism. Things get left out. Forever.

Recently some friends invited us to their ongoing couples’ group. They meet every other Thursday night. They bring the kids, set them up in another room with their homework and a video, and go do their thing separately. “Come along,” they said. “It’ll be great to have you.”

Sure. Take Joseph to an unfamiliar environment, set him up in a room with kids he doesn’t know, and leave him there to enjoy himself. Ha! Only in our dreams.

Another thing left out.

Blue Eyes is a builder. He works with a friend whose 3-year old boy recently threw a long tantrum because he couldn’t go to work with his dad to build with him. Blue Eyes thinks the time is near when they’ll have the kid come for a couple of hours to bang some nails and “help out.”

Blue Eyes has tried to interest Joseph in building, but Joseph feels incompetent and uncomfortable, and he shows no interest. It’s yet another place where Blue Eyes and Joseph don’t connect.

Another thing left out.

Recently we had extended family over. There were around fifteen people at our house. Joseph spent a large part of the time off by himself, telling me, “There are too many people here. It makes me nervous!”

It’s such a battle getting him comfortable in group settings that we’re considering not going to Thanksgiving gatherings any more. We’re not sure it’s worth the struggle.

Another thing left out.

The biggest thing that’s left out, in my view, is deep conversation. I want to talk with my kid about his place in our family history; I want to dialog with him about spirituality in all its nuances; I want to ask him questions about his inner life and get answers that mean something. I want him to ask me deep, interested questions. I want to teach Joseph some of the wisdom I’ve gleaned; I want him to teach me from his youthful understanding.

I want what conversations like these lead to: both parties coming up with a change in perspective, a deeper understanding of each other and the topic of discussion.  I want it, I want it, I want it.

Sigh. Another thing left out.

I know things can get better. We thought we might have to leave out living a normal life at all when Joseph was so terrified of dogs. Dogs are everywhere, and life was becoming one horrifying incident after another. But now dogs are a non-issue. So things can, and do, change. But they probably won’t change too much.

It is the way it is. I can’t fix it and I can’t change it. I am feeling sad about it. I am allowing that sorrow to fill my heart and I am sharing it with the Divine Mother, who knows all sorrows.

I recently heard a song that said God prefers the honest cry of a broken heart to a thousand hallelujahs.

Well, with the numbers of autistic children on the rise, God must be hearing some real honest cries from a lot of broken hearts.

God alone knows, but maybe that’s one of the reasons we’re given children with autism.

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