In the first years after Joseph’s diagnosis, we focused much of our energy on the biomedical side of autism. Earlier blogs have a lot to say about Joseph’s gut issues and sleep issues, and the many treatments he/we undertook. Even our first RDI Consultant admitted that there was virtually no change in Joseph their first year together, because he was simply too sick physically to advance in any other way.

Joseph was gluten-free and casein-free from ages 3 to 61/2. He was also virtually sugar-free. We saw a lot of progress in those years. Expanded vocabulary, bowels that actually moved, more social engagement. Eventually even sleep, oh thank God.

And Then There Was Public School.

In kindergarten, I made a batch of gluten-free cupcakes to stash in the teachers’ freezer as a substitute for any birthday cupcakes parents might bring in. I gave the teacher GF crackers to keep. She gave me the heads-up when anything untoward was happening, foodwise, in the classroom, and I’d scream up some reasonable facsimile.  Happily, Joseph got out before lunchtime so we mostly didn’t have to deal with what the other kids were eating — and, sigh, the hot lunches that you can buy.

When first grade hit, it was all over before we knew it. In the second week of school,  the school secretary called: Joseph had had two hot lunches already, and when were we planning to pay for them? I have yet to see a hot lunch without gluten in it, and it always comes with a container of milk.

I got a little hysterical at this news. I couldn’t decide whether to laugh or cry that my son had, of his own accord, broken the diet that had done so much for him. I called Blue Eyes, and we decided to just roll with it. Since then, we’ve been GFCF at home but not when we’re out. Two hot lunches allowed per week. It’s worked pretty dang well.

Until recently.

It started with the chewing. He’s always been a chewer of pencils and the occasional shirt collar, but suddenly he had to have something in his mouth all the time. Hankies, soaking wet and well-chewed, would hang down from his mouth. Sleeves became soaked with saliva.

Then he started stimming more. Flapping, doing his music (humming, singing) so much that he couldn’t stop it to concentrate on his homework or his food.

But worse — much worse, if you ask me — is that he began sleeping badly. Awake in the middle of the night, awake way too early in the morning. Tired and grumpy all day long. Near tears because of the tiredness. When Joseph doesn’t sleep, I don’t sleep. It was like old times — bad.

And every morning, as soon as he’d come downstairs, he’d ask for sugar. Chocolately Koala Krisps or Gorilla Munch or yogurt tubes or candy or cookies.

As much as I adore denial, I could ignore it no longer. My son has Candida.

Yeast outbreak is very common in autistic kids. In those early days we used healthy eating, Nystatin and various natural supplements to control it.

It’s different now. Sugar and starches seem to be a natural part of public school, and we have felt powerless to stop it. There’s something about a kid who is inherently different from the others telling me that “All the other kids get to eat it!” that quickly wears down my resistance. After all, I want him to be like all the other kids.

But now it feels like do — or die. So, we told him, he is off sugar for the time being.

Ohhhh it’s hard. Every day except today (so far, anyway), Joseph has had major meltdowns about missing sugar. Little does he know that this makes me all the more determined. We’ve upped the Grapefruit Seed Extract and the Corcumin. We are starting on a new product, inspired by the folks on the blog A Ventography, as soon as it arrives in the mail.

After a few days of slogging through — no sugar and no sleep and no improvement – ugh! — we are starting to see some progress. Sleep is going better and the chewing is slowing down a bit. More than that, even: Joseph is suddenly more cheerful. Can Candida make a person act like an angry, sullen teenager when he’s only eight? I don’t know, but the change is a very welcome thing.

Joseph keeps asking about Valentines Day. Can he have sugar then? Candy hearts and all the other goodies that his fellow students will give him? I am finding it  hard to say no. I am saying that it is his choice: he may be feeling so much better without sugar that he will decide to pass it up. I am not as mean as I act; this mama’s heart simply can’t say no to Valentines treats. If we have to deal with a flare-up, we’ll all learn something from it.

The older I get, the more it registers that life is full of seasons. This season is harder than some, but truly it’s just a season. I’m holding on to the concept of effort over time: the idea that effort, consistently applied over a good amount of time, will make more difference in one’s life than almost anything else.

Body, mind, emotions…it’s all so connected. It’s a microcosm of the macrocosm, because we on this earth are all deeply connected as well. Wishing you health and happiness in all of your connections.

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