The body is a great teacher. Mine has been a rather constant, somewhat troublesome body, with something painful happening in it almost all of the time.

Lately it’s been my right arm. Pins and needles through the arm. Massive pain through my wrist and fingers. Writing’s been hard. Sleep’s been harder.

I think that we have much more impact, and influence, on our health than we tend to believe. One night recently, Blue Eyes and I were talking about my arm dilemma and the thoughts/beliefs that might be behind it. He looked at me and said, “You carry a lot of fear.”

In characteristic old-married-person response, I rolled my eyes and told him how far I’d come in getting over that fear. But before I went to sleep that night, I put the question out to the Universe: What is this pain about?

Asking is soooo good to do. On the way to school the next morning, Joseph and I were listening to a recently-purchased CD by Staci Frenes, and we heard these words:

Your grip’s too tight.

That’s it! I realized. My grip is way too tight!

I think back to Joseph’s diagnosis seven years ago. My body and mind curled into a tight fist when the word autism was spoken. I held on through that oh-so-difficult journey, sometimes hanging over a cliff, barely able to grip the edge.

But grip I did.

sword fightRemember the old-fashioned sword-fighters? One steps up to the other, sword drawn, and says, “En garde!” I think I’ve been “en garde” for seven years: Body poised and tight, adrenalin flowing, at war with the medical industry, the school system, the naysayers, funding sources, the co-occuring conditions. At war with autism and its devastating effects. At war with my own stress level and insomnia. Even at war with the war.

Without much awareness around it, I have been wound tight, feeding off a hot suffocating tension, watching and waiting (even in my sleep) for the next battle.

And now? Joseph is nine, about to finish second grade in his typical classroom.  He is navigating his life in his own unique, amazing way. Yes, he still has autism. Yes, he still faces trials and tribulations because of it.

But.

It’s time to relax the fist.

It just is. It simply is.

I am going to open my aching fingers, spread my arms, open my heart…

…and free fall.

free fallEver wonder what it feels like
to free fall?

Nothin’ underneath you
To catch your fall
to look up at a big sky
and feel so small
Ever wonder what it’d be like, feel like, to live life
out of your control?
~Staci Frenes

Free falling is the image I am taking through my life now. It’s only been an illusion of control, after all. How much more fun it is to no longer pretend I have any. To be like a hawk gliding along, surfing circles on air currents, simply present and letting go into the experience. Not a thought about what comes next until it’s there.

Sometimes I’ll thank someone who is working with Joseph and they will respond by saying, “It’s a great privilege.”  To be honest, I have never understood this. But this morning I felt a little charge up my spine: How amazing that I get to help this special-needs kid go through life! Whereas many other parents are stuck with normal, think-inside-the-box kinds of kids, I get this really unique, creative, most unusual child to hang out with.

And I felt it. I felt how great a privilege it is to be Joseph’s mom.

* * *

My arm is getting better.

Interestingly, the soreness has made my right hand unable to grip into a tight fist.

That’s improving now. Soon I’ll be able to grip tightly.

But I won’t.

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