A friend of mine, a fellow yogini, got diagnosed with advanced stage breast cancer.  Suddenly she had only a short time left, a few weeks maybe, before she would die. Her husband tried to be brave, but one day he completely lost it, drowning in his sorrow.

Mara was not a strong, emotionless person. Yet she looked at her husband and said sternly, “Control the reactive processes!” Her energy and focus remained centered and inward, from the moment of diagnosis to the moment she passed. It was remarkable.

Mara’s words are coming back to me a lot lately. We are on vacation with Joseph, which is difficult for two reasons: One, there’s no getting away from the autism, and, two, Joseph’s reactive processes are even less controlled. Just to cope he is stimmy and perseverating and going out of his way to try to get Blue Eyes and me to react.

JosephIn the past few days, as I think about controlling the reactive processes, I see that Joseph is both my greatest blessing and my biggest curse. Yogananda said,  “You must stand unshaken amidst the crash of breaking worlds,” and I think about this when, for the (I am not exaggerating) hundredth time that day, Joseph starts talking about the tracts he’ll record on his CD.

Or when he is too anxious to be alone: to sleep, to use the bathroom, to be in a room by himself, for God’s sake. Or when he does his weird autistic dance, in private or in public, contorting his body and wriggling his fingers and singing in a strange, otherworldly way.

It’s all amplified by being away from his familiar environment and I understand that, but man do my reactive processes want to react.

Part of it is the way I ‘should’ on things. A vacation ‘should’ be fun, stressless, effortless. I hear my sometimes-therapist in my head saying, “But Joseph has high anxiety and his autistic tendencies come out big time when you travel. Why would you expect anything else?”

Right. Why would I expect anything else?

What a great situation for a yogi. What a wonderful chance to watch the mind and its resistance – to smile at the struggle it creates because it’s not getting what it wants. What an opportunity to dig deeply to stay in my center, especially when the kid who knows my reactive processes intimately would like nothing better than to pull me out of it. What a joy to just stay present, letting each moment be what it is without adding shoulds, what-ifs or resistances to it. What a reminder to call on God and legions of angels for their help.

What a blessing to finally sit down, after way too long, and write a blog post.

Control the reactive processes.

God help me.

 

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