One of the trippy things about having a kid with autism is that, unless your kid happens to be displaying autistic symptoms right at that moment, s/he looks pretty normal. This is why having to take my ten year-old, normal-looking son into the ladies’ bathroom is an excruciating process for me.

It’ll be like this: we’re out and about, miles from home, and Joseph or I needs to use the bathroom. So far so good, right? We walk to the facilities and, naturally, they are separated into men’s bathrooms and ladies’ bathrooms.

(Allow me a slight digression. In Australia, they are labeled “Male Toilets” and “Female Toilets.” I always wondered, how do they know the gender of a TOILET? But, as I say, I digress.)

This is where we run into trouble. As usual I will say, “Do you want to try the men’s?” And as usual, Joseph, filled with anxiety, will answer with a resounding “NO!”

Still, every now and then he will actually open the door and stick his head in. Then he’ll pull his head out and say, loudly enough for the poor, innocent man to hear, “I can’t go in there. There’s a MAN in there!” Or he’ll just say, “I can’t! I’m too scared!”

And so, here we go again. Into the ladies’ bathroom, me and my ten year-old, normal-looking son.

Now, Joseph knows full well that it’s weird for him to be in the ladies’ bathroom. Believe me, I’ve tried to shame him out of the practice any number of times. But instead he hurries into the bathroom, rushes into a stall, closes the door, and asks loudly, “Mom! Where are you?”

Once he’s figured out that I am close by he continues his interrogation. “What are you doing, Mom?” “When will you be done?” “Aren’t you done YET, Mom?” Then, just for a little extra entertainment, he’ll start in with, “Mom, there’s another woman in this bathroom! Help me, Mom! Help me!” (This latter statement is because he’s embarrassed to be in there — thanks to me — and doesn’t quite know what to do once more women arrive.)

The good news is, once Joseph starts acting like this, people quickly figure out he’s got a disability and I can show my face again without being embarrassed. So, see? It all works out. Ha ha.

You could say that it’s yet another thing I need to surrender to. You could point out that it’s the practice of building humility through humiliation. But please don’t. I’m just not in the mood to see the longer-rhythm good that could come out of this.

bathroom signWe are on vacation in Oregon. Beyond the horrid days like the one I outlined in my last post, we’ve been truly enjoying ourselves. And THIS is a sign I saw outside an Oregon bathroom at a campground.

Glory be! I LOVE this sign. I want this sign on every public bathroom from here to Timbuktu.

But until that happens, can you do me a favor? If you see some normal-looking kid in the wrong gender bathroom with his/her parent, just smile pleasantly and look the other way. It’s not nearly as bad for you as it is for that parent. You can trust me on that.

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