Two weeks ago, a dear friend took his life. As soon as we heard, in shock and grief, Blue Eyes and I made emergency arrangements for Joseph and headed to his house. As we got out of the car his wife hugged us and said, “They are just taking Ian away. Say goodbye to him while you can.”

The coroner, who was helping to carry him out in a stretcher, unwrapped his face. Blood spattered and frozen, it didn’t look like Ian. Ian, the ever-smiling, ever-caring, silently serviceful man, was not in that body. The Best Man at our wedding 24 years ago, the deep friend and brother in God, this was no longer present in that body.

Most of our meditation group gathered there. Hugs, love and tears were exchanged freely. Oh, Ian. How we miss you.

Do we not know what an impact we make on others in our simple lives? Ian and his wife were so kind to Joseph. Healers come in all kinds of packages, and Ian, by his humble example of love and care, was a healer. He was an important male role model in my son’s life — and now he has removed his physical presence from our lives. The reason will always be a mystery.

In sharing with our group a few days later, his wife brought up how small talk was so hard for Ian. He found eye contact hard. He didn’t know how to start discussing inconsequential things and let the conversation move around to things of more substance. His wife said that this brought up a lot of anxiety for him — how he wished he could be “enough.”

I knew Ian had social anxiety and that he couldn’t easily meet my eyes. A long time ago I had silently diagnosed him as on the spectrum. Way up on the spectrum, but still on it. Yet he was famous for his huge smile, so friendly and sweet. I never, ever would have tagged him as a potential suicide.

Held a pistol to his heart and pulled the trigger. A nice, neat hole that took him instantly. And such symbolism. A broken heart. No more heart for this life.

We didn’t, couldn’t, tell Joseph how it happened. We told him Ian’s heart stopped, but Joseph guessed that Ian took pills to make that happen and we didn’t contradict him. I wonder if many suicides are from people on the spectrum. The only other suicide I’ve had close to me was a teenage neighbor, and, looking back, I remember that he couldn’t make eye contact and that he walked funny — on his toes. Sigh.

A surreal twist to the whole situation was that Ellen, a medium from England, was visiting our friends. She comes twice a year to the US and conducts readings with loved ones from the other side. So as we grieved on that day two weeks ago, she would quietly point and say, “He’s standing right in front of that tree. He keeps saying, ‘I’m free! I’m free!'”. She said he took his life because he felt like he didn’t belong. All these years trying to fit in, and he just didn’t belong. He was so confused, she said.

As a spiritual being having a human experience, I too have often felt like an alien in this life. This is a common feeling for those of us who identify with our spiritual side more than the human one.  But to feel that one also just can’t fit in with other humans — that must be hard. To stand quietly while others talk because you can’t think of what to say. To feel things deeply and not be able to express them. To be unable to engage or outwardly connect with people who you know and love. Ugh.

I pray for my Joseph, and for all our spectrum kids. May they make their way in this crazy world. May they find connection and authenticity. And, when it’s not working, may they seek help. As Ian’s sister said at his memorial service:

I wish you had not been so heroic with your burdens;
I would have carried more, much more and gladly.
It would have been an honor.
So I spit on stoicism today;
That chill perjurer who poses as a virtue.

Someone once told me that Satan loves it when we don’t ask for help. And I remember, at an OA meeting, the leader said that if you share your pain, you leave it there; but if you leave it unsaid, you take it with you.

May we have such a good relationship with our ASD kids, and all our kids, that they can share the good, the bad, and the agonizing. May we, as parents, have the ability to empathize, to hear and feel their pain, and not try to gloss it over or make it all better when it’s not. May our children feel heard. And loved. And worthwhile enough to choose life when facing the darkness.

Om. Peace. Amen.

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