You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘karma’ tag.

Professor Temple Grandin, perhaps the best-known person with autism next to Rain Man (who, I remind you, was a made-up character), once commented that we need to keep the lives of our autistic kids interesting. I have pondered this many times over the years, agreeing with her that presenting new and exciting adventures to Joseph keeps him interested, engaged and challenged.

But when your kid has anxiety — which is extremely common for people with autism — it has to be looked at slightly differently. bell-curveOur RDI consultant once drew us a bell curve like the one to the right. The line in the center separated the two sides. To the left he wrote “Productive” and to the right he wrote “Unproductive.” There is a point, he explained, where challenge simply becomes unproductive. While you don’t want to make Joseph’s life too cushy (too far left), you also don’t want to immerse him in events that produce unproductive anxiety (right).

But anxiety is unpredictable and often irrational, so you don’t quite know what is going to push someone over the edge. Like last week, for example…

We went camping. Fun, right? Blue Eyes and I both come from camping families and we have wonderful memories of the adventures we had on those trips. Joseph was excited: we camp every year for a few days so he knew, more or less, what to expect. Blue Eyes had even fixed up our relic of an RV, and we took that along (I happily spent the nights in a tent next to them.)

anxietyThe first morning, anxiety struck. Why? Who knows. Dogs were leash-only, so that was okay. Maybe being out of the routine? Somewhere new? We were in Lassen National Park: Volcano territory. Like a volcano, Joseph’s anxiety built up and exploded out – hot, fierce and uncontrollable.

What we forgot since we last went camping is that campgrounds provide a great view into other people’s lives. There is nowhere to hide a kid who is loudly expressing his fear, resistance and anguish. Think humiliation.

On the other hand, other people couldn’t hide either. We watched happy families with excited kids who were loving — and making the most of — every minute of their camping experience. Living so openly, side by side with typical families, really got to me for a while there. I felt terribly sad.

By the third day of some difficult times, Blue Eyes had a brilliant insight: Part of Joseph’s anxiety had to do with the structure of the day. If we’d done a morning hike and returned to the campsite for lunch without any particular plans for the afternoon, this was perceived by Joseph as a high-stress situation. Whereas Blue Eyes and I looked forward to a few empty hours, our kid did not. He’s not like this at home, but we had to roll with what was happening there. It worked to say, “Let’s take half an hour to rest and then go for a bike ride.” It didn’t work to say, “Let’s do whatever we want for the afternoon.” This helped. A lot.

Looking back, I don’t think I handled the anxiety well. I was irritated. I hated that others could see and hear our troubles. Why couldn’t Joseph just reason himself out of this? Why was he behaving in such a ridiculous way?

But the beauty of reflection is the learning that comes from it. I don’t fully understand Joseph’s pain and I doubt I ever will. But rather than judge him (to take another view of the bell curve: unproductive behavior), I want to feel compassion for him and support him (productive behavior). We are going to get to work on this anxiety, starting with an Ayurvedic specialist who focuses on kids with anxiety.

During one of the low points of the camping trip, Blue Eyes pointed at our sweet dog and said, “That’s our gift.” Then he gestured toward Joseph (who was out of earshot) and said, “That’s our work.”

Paramhansa Yogananda, in a letter to one of his devotees (though I think in actuality all of his devotees), said,

Everybody’s difficulty is different and he or she has to win that test of karma…I will never give up my job about you….Not only will I ever forgive you, but ever lift you up no matter how many times you fall.

This, I believe is the work of us parents, especially those of us with special needs kids or rebellious kids or troubled kids. Our kids come in with their own karma and their own tests. We can’t change that, but we can let them know that we won’t give up on them. We will ever forgive them, ever work with them, ever help them to be all they can be.

Dang, it’s hard. But here I lean on Yogananda again, with these excerpts:

I shall ever be with you and through Divine Mother guard you from all harm, and will constantly whisper to you guidance through your loving self.

So do not become discouraged and tired…

A smooth life is not a victorious life — and I will give you lots of my good karma, so you will get through.

…not only will I invisibly help you but visibly, through many here.

IMG_1977Opening to receive that good karma. Exhaling a big exhale and allowing my own anger, resistance and anxiety to dissolve as I remember, yet again, that this work is much greater than just Blue Eyes and me. The Universe offers unlimited support, if only I allow it in.
Blessings.

Advertisements